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2020

Unveiling a modern identity & total refresh of a youth soccer club.

In Pittsburgh's youth soccer scene, clubs focus so much on their on-field product that their often-neglected brands tend to blend together. Arsenal FC of Pittsburgh found itself caught in this trend, leaving its identity unchanged for almost two decades.

With an opportunity to stand out in a crowded field, Arsenal aimed to reinvent itself after a long period of stagnation, starting with a much-needed logo overhaul and a reimagining of its online presence.

Copy

Web

Design

Brand

Strategy

In Pittsburgh, the youth soccer clubs have understandably been focused on their on-field deliverables. As a result, when viewed through a branding lens, most local clubs are interchangable reiterations of the same basic concept. Arsenal FC of Pittsburgh, or simply Arsenal, had fallen into this trap.

After its founding in 2001, the club’s brand, crest and website had remained virtually untouched for nearly twenty years. Arsenal had a real opportunity to differentiate itself among a crowded but similar field, and the break in youth sports due to the pandemic provided the perfect opening to capitalize.

The first step was a modernization of the old badge—one that used imagery whose significance had long been forgotten. I worked with the club leaders to remember what the club’s founding values were, where its name came from, and what is important to them today. The result: a brand new, modern badge where each piece was designed intentionally.

Starting from a blank slate in WordPress, I wanted the site to accomplish two main goals: first, to keep members updated on current club news, and secondly, to effectively show and tell potential members about Arsenal and what they can expect when joining.

Throughout the site, the new Arsenal badge is present, whether actively or passively, and photos of players are prominently featured alongside bold, confident statements. We had the goal of assertively stating what the club stands for, and used font that matched the tone.

Functionally speaking, the home page acts as a narrative to highlight the clubs three pillars: player, team, and club. As you scroll through the narrative, you’re invited to learn more by several calls-to-action which create a journey that leads new families to a page where they can opt to join the club.

As a revenue generator, the site needed lower barriers to entry, so I created clear areas to sign up for the programs being offered, which are supported by easy-to-understand descriptions of each.

Finally, the site needed to match the mobility of its target audience, which is primarily multi-sport and multi-child families.

Following its launch, Arsenal’s website experienced a steady rise in traffic and engagement, while its external programs grew significantly in participation.

In Pittsburgh, the youth soccer clubs have understandably been focused on their on-field deliverables. As a result, when viewed through a branding lens, most local clubs are interchangable reiterations of the same basic concept. Arsenal FC of Pittsburgh, or simply Arsenal, had fallen into this trap.

After its founding in 2001, the club’s brand, crest and website had remained virtually untouched for nearly twenty years. Arsenal had a real opportunity to differentiate itself among a crowded but similar field, and the break in youth sports due to the pandemic provided the perfect opening to capitalize.

The first step was a modernization of the old badge—one that used imagery whose significance had long been forgotten. I worked with the club leaders to remember what the club’s founding values were, where its name came from, and what is important to them today. The result: a brand new, modern badge where each piece was designed intentionally.

Starting from a blank slate in WordPress, I wanted the site to accomplish two main goals: first, to keep members updated on current club news, and secondly, to effectively show and tell potential members about Arsenal and what they can expect when joining.

Throughout the site, the new Arsenal badge is present, whether actively or passively, and photos of players are prominently featured alongside bold, confident statements. We had the goal of assertively stating what the club stands for, and used font that matched the tone.

Functionally speaking, the home page acts as a narrative to highlight the clubs three pillars: player, team, and club. As you scroll through the narrative, you’re invited to learn more by several calls-to-action which create a journey that leads new families to a page where they can opt to join the club.

As a revenue generator, the site needed lower barriers to entry, so I created clear areas to sign up for the programs being offered, which are supported by easy-to-understand descriptions of each.

Finally, the site needed to match the mobility of its target audience, which is primarily multi-sport and multi-child families.

Following its launch, Arsenal’s website experienced a steady rise in traffic and engagement, while its external programs grew significantly in participation.

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